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Freshwater Weekly: May 21, 2021

Posted on May 21, 2021 by

THIS WEEK: Feasibility Study Started for a Spaceport on Lake Superior Shores + Open Public Comment Period on Pollution Status of the Ashtabula River + First Nation Request for Herbicide Ban Gets Support from Green Party in Canada + Dr. Al Gredicks Calls for Greater Dam Safety and More Inspections + Plastics Found in Great Lakes, Our Food, and Us


Feasibility Study Started for a Spaceport on Lake Superior Shores

A proposed rocket launching site on the shores of Lake Superior has raised many questions.  A community group, Citizens for a Safe and Clean Lake Superior, recently organized to address the potential impact on the environment and community.  Not only is the project site on the shores of Lake Superior, it is home to the Granot Loma Lodge which is on the National Register of Historic places. 


Open Public Comment Period on Pollution Status of the Ashtabula River

The Ashtabula River, once a very polluted river, is recovering due to years of restoration efforts.  State and federal agencies are now requesting input on whether to remove the polluted status of the River, also called delisting.  Freshwater Future recognizes the work of the Ashtabula River Advisory Council for their progress on restoring the habitat. The public comment period regarding the status of the Ashtabula River is open until June 6th.  


Dr. Al Gredicks Calls for Greater Dam Safety and More Inspections

Dam safety is a major concern in the Great Lakes Region. Please take a moment and watch this 5-minute video that discusses dam safety in Wisconsin and Michigan and why state and federal funding for dam safety and infrastructure needs to be a priority.


First Nation Request for Herbicide Ban Gets Support from Green Party in Canada

First Nation leaders and environmental advocates in Canada are pushing for provincial and local governments to ban the herbicide glyphosate used widely in agriculture and forestry. Fredericton Green MP Jenica Atwin is now proposing legislation that would make it illegal to manufacture, possess, distribute, or use this herbicide.


Micro-Plastics Found in Great Lakes, Our Food, and Us

Great Lakes beach cleanup volunteers have estimated that nearly 85% of the trash collected is plastic and researchers believe a staggering 22 million pounds of plastic debris winds up in the Great Lakes each year. Much of this plastic is ground into microscopic particles that are ingested by fish, and in turn, consumed by humans. Micro-plastics are also showing up in our tap water and beverages such as beer, highlighting the urgent need for alternatives to single-use plastics. Listen to the full podcast here on All Things Considered, Morning Edition.

@FreshwaterFutur

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Images courtesy of Steven Huyser-Honig,
West Grand Boulevard Collaborative, & Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve.